Craven County Digital History Exhibit

1893 Business Directory, Pt 2

Bibliographical Information:
Business Directory of the City of New Berne, N.C.: To Which is Added Historical and Statistical Matter of Interest (Raleigh, N.C.: Edwards and Broughton, 1893), 91 p.
One of New Bern's earlier city directories, this volume includes detailed information about the city's businesses and citizens. With the absence of the 1890 federal census, this book constitutes the largest printed listing of the residents of New Bern for that period.

Due to the number of images, this directory has been divided into several web pages. This page contains Historical and Statistical Matter [Pages 11-29].

Other sections of this directory:

Font matter, Title Page and Editor's Notes [Pages 1 (Front Cover)-10]

Historical and Statistical Matter [Pages 11-29]--This page

Advertisements [Pages 30-36]

Directory, Last Names Beginning A-J [Pages 37-48]

Directory, Last Names Beginning K-Y [Pages 49-60]

Advertisements [Pages 61-70]

Classified Directory [Pages 71-77]

Advertisements [Pages 78-92 (Back Cover)]


[Page 11]


HISTORICAL AND STATISTICAL MATTER ABOUT THE
CITY OF NEW BERNE
FROM A.D. 1710 TO A.D. 1893.
-----
COMPILED BY A. HATCHETT.
-----
CITY GOVERNMENT, 1893-'94.
Corporation Courts are held in City Hall, on Craven street
between Pollock and South Front. Officers are elected
annually. At present they are:

Mayor...............................WILLIAM ELLIS.
Clerk and Tax Collector.............w. D. WALLACE.
Attorney............................STEPHEN C. BRAGAW.
Treasurer...........................H. J. LOVICK.
Port Physician......................R. S. PRIMROSE, M. D.

COUNCILMEN.
CHARLES REIZENSTEIN, J. E. LATHAM,
EDWARD GEROCK, J. F. CLARK,
H. J. LOVICK, F. ULRICH,
V. A. CRAWFORD, J. W. EUBANKS.

POLICE DEPARTMENT.
JAMES T. LEWIS, Chief.
J. K. LANEK, J. B. DIXON
ELI ELLIOT, THOMAS J. TOLER,
HENRY T. BRINSON.
(The latter Sanitary Officer.)

Sexton Cedar Grove Cemetery--D. H. STALLINGS.
Sexton Greenwood Cemetery--D. BERT.

UNITED STATES OFFICERS.
Postmaster--W. E. CLARK.
Collector of Customs--ROBERT HANCOCK.
Clerk of United States District Court--GEORGE GREEN.
 


[Page 12]


GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION.

Mr. Frank A. Heywood, in his pamphlet, "The Norfolk and Southern Railroad and its Commercial Tributaries," says:

"New Bern is the natural base of commercial operations for Eastern North Carolina, and there you had best go if you desire a perfect home, and there you must go if you expect to find the perfect comforts not to be obtained except in those localities where the advantages are accrued by large communities congregating together."

Mr. Jonathan Havens, in his "Pamlico Section," says correctly:

"The city of New Bern is beautifully situated at the junction of the Neuse and Trent rivers, the Neuse forming its eastern and the Trent its southern boundary--both wide and beautiful streams. * * * Owing to its situation at the junction of two wide rivers, and only twenty-eight statute miles from the ocean, the winters are mild and the summer west greatly modified by the daily sea breeze from the southheat and southeast."

From Mr. Washington Bryan's Hand-book, "New Berne as a Health Resort," I quote the following:

"The entire winter frequently passes without snow, and sleets are practically unknown, the thermometer seldom registering below the freezing point."

NEW BERNE AS A HOME.

There is, perhaps, no other city in the United States where such conditions exist for a pleasant home as in New Berne. Blessed with a most delightful and healthy climate, the death rate being less than that of any city of the South, from a higienic standpoint it is without a rival. Churches of all the Protestant denominations are in its confines, and are well attended. Schools, both public and private, are of high grade and conveniently located; her professional men are known prominently all over the State; and her moral and intellectual reputation is as exalted to-day as when she was deservedly named the "Athens of North Carolina," some seventy years ago. Well drained streets, lined with


[Page 13]


magnificent shade trees lend additional beauty to the elegant private residences sitting back among evergreens and flower-bedecked yards, with which no place of this size in the country can compare. The buildings generally are not only sightly, but comfortable, and rents are reasonably low. The cost of living, if you so choose, can be amde almost nominal. The products of the waters--oysters, clams, shrimps, escallops and seventy different kinds of fish--are so plentiful in the market that the average price of fresh fish does not exceed two cents a pound. The very centre of the best trucking section of the country, fresh vegetables can be had the year round at prices to suit the most economical. The contiguous farming country supplies the butchers with excellent beef and mutton, while the huntsmen bring in a profusion of wild game--ducks of various varieties, squirrels, deer, bear, geese, partridges, etc.--to tickle the palate of the epicure. But, greater than all these in the consideration of a home, is the character of the people, kind, courteous, chivalric, honorable, and generous. To the labor seeker, the lumbermen and the truck farmers give ready employment the year round at good wages. The two railroads and the various lines of steam and sail-boats give ample facility for both passengers and freight to any quarter.
Summing up, New Berne has more advantages and fewer drawbacks as a place of residence than any other prosperous business city on the map.

The new water supplied by the Water-works Company from artesian wells, will add to the health and comfort of citizens, while the Electric Street Railway, now being constructed will give ready and cheap transportation to every part of the city.

Three banks afford ample money facilities, and local panics are unknown.

NEW BERNE.

1st. THE NAME.--It was named by Baron De Graffenried, the first settler, Newbern, after his native city of Bern in Switzerland, in 1710, and the official records from the colonial days to the late war so spelled it. For twenty-odd years both official documents and common custom have used the spelling
 


[Page 14]


of this caption, until recently the Postoffice Department has returned to the ancient style. This the citizens of the place dissent from and continue to use the modern acceptation as right and proper. Possibly the more correct orthography would be New Bern, to distinguish it from old Bern
in Switzerland, as New York is from old York in England.

2d. ITS SETTLEMENT.--The town was first settled in 1710 by a colony of German and Swiss under Louis Mitchell and Baron De Graffenried. A few emigrants from the Virginia colonies had preceded them in 1707 and settled along the Neuse and Trent Rivers. In 1711 the colony was suddenly attacked by Indians and some sixty of their number were killed. Assistance arriving from Virginia and South Carolina, the Indians were besieged at Fort Barnwell, eighteen miles from here, and those not killed were made prisoners.

The compiler is indebted to Mr. W. H. Oliver for the following extracts from the official records:

A.D. 1723. At a meeting of the Assembly held at Edenton the 23d day of November, 1723, the following act was passed: "Whereas, a certain plot of ground, being part of a tract of land lying in the fork of Neuse river, late belonging to Hon. Col. Thomas Pollock, deceased, but now the property of Mr. Cullen Pollock, was formerly laid out into a township by the name of Newbern (describing it), be it enacted by his Excellency of the Province of Carolina, by and with the advice and consent of the rest of the members of the General Assembly now met at Edenton, that the same is hereby declared, confirmed and incorporated into a township by the name of Newbern." Signed: William Reed, Esq., President; T. Pollock, M. Moore, Charles Gates and John Lovick, Lords Proprietors.

A.D. 1738. The first Assembly held at Newbern, Gabriel Johnston, Esq., Governor.

A.D. 1739. Assembly held at Newbern. An act "for erecting the village called Newton in New Hanover County into a town and township by the name of Wilmington."

A.D. 1747. Assembly held at Newbern. An act "to erect the upper part of Craven County into a county by the name of Johnston County."

A.D. 1751. Assembly held at Newbern. An act "to confirm the four lots in Newbern for the use of the public forever."
 


[Page 15]


John Stanly, Edward Griffith and Jeremiah Vail appointed to carry on and perfect the public building in the town of Newbern. That four lots of land, numbers 248, 249, 250 and 251, in the town of Newbern is for the use of the public forever.

A.D. 1756. Assembly at Newbern; Arthur Dobbs, Esq., Governor. An act "for the better regulation of the town of Newbern, and for the election of five Commissioners, who are required to take the following oath: 'I do swear that I will execute the office of a Commissioner of the town of Newbern faithfully, impartially and truly.'"

A.D. 1767. Assembly held at Newbern. An act "for building a court-house in the town of Newbern. Said to be built on the public lots in the town of Newbern, or at the intersection of Broad street."

A.D. 1766. Assembly at Newbern, William Tryon, Esq., Governor. An act "to erect a convenient building in the town of Newbern for the residence of the Governor or Commander-in-chief." (The Colonial Palace foundation walls now stand at the foot of George street.)

A.D. 1766. An act "to establish a school-house in the town of Newbern." (The old Academy building.) Signed by William Tryon, Esq., Governor; James Hasell, President; John Harvey, Speaker. "That James Davis, of the town of Newbern, be appointed Printer to this Province for the term of three years."

A.D. 1773. Josiah Martin, Governor; Richard Caswell, Speaker. Assembly held at Newbern. An act "to purchase a fire-engine, buckets and ladders, and for the erection of pumps."

A.D. 1774. Assembly held at Newbern. An act "to compel the inhabitants of the town of Newbern to pay their taxes." (This being the last meeting of the Colonial General Assembly.)

A.D. 1776. First meeting after independence was held at Halifax, 17 days of December 1776.

A.D. 1777. Meeting held at Newbern. An act "to establish a loan office in Newbern."

A.D. 1868. Raleigh. The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: "That the corporation heretofore existing as the Town of Newbern shall hereafter be established and known as the City of Newbern."
 


[Page 16]


MANUFACTURES.

Among the largest manufacturies in the State is the fertilizer factory of Messrs. E.H. & J.A. Meadows, who put up seven or eight different brands by the thousand tons, of different analysis, but all high grade and made principally of fish.

The largest grain mill in Eastern North Carolina is that of Mr. J.A. Meadows at this place.

A knitting factory of large capacity also forms an important part of New Berne's industrial enterprises.

The principal manufacturing interest, however, is in lumber. Twelve saw and planing mills, the aggregate capacity of which amounts to hundreds of thousands of feet a day, convert the various kinds of timber so plentiful here into material for building houses and boats, and making furniture.
About ninety per cent. of this lumber is shipped directly to Northern markets, to Europe and other foreign countries.

There is one cigar factory.

Engines, boilers and saw-mills are made here that compare favorably with those from other places.

Sail-making is also one of the profitable industries.

The two carriage factories turn out good work, and do a large business in the eastern part of the State.

There are two large barrel factories finding ready sale for their output, particularly in the trucking season.

Two large shingle mills ship by the car and boat load all over the country.

The shirt factory sells all of its output without trouble.

ATLANTIC & NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD CO.

Directors appointed by the Governor: W.S. Chadwick, Beaufort, N.C., President; W.T. Caho, Bayboro, N.C.; C.E. Foy, New Berne, N.C.; Enoch Wadsworth, New Berne, N.C.; S.W. Latham, New Berne, N.C.; W.L. Kennedy, Falling Creek, N.C.; W.W. Caraway, Kinston, N.C.; Charles Dewey, Goldsboro, N.C.

Directors elected by the Stockholders: John M. Morehead,  Charlotte, N.C.; Demsey Wood, Falling Creek, N.C.; T.D. Webb, Morehead City, N.C.; L.H. Cutler, New Berne, N.C.
 


[Page 17]


FISH MARKETS.

In this connection, a standard authority has said : "New Bern has one of the finest fish markets in the world. It equals, if it does not excel, in quantity, quality and variety the far-famed fish market of Havana." The appended list will establish the truth of this assertion, as also the further statement that "the oysters of New Bern are abundant and of superior quality as to size and flavor, those from New river being equal to the celebrated Lynnhaven."

The different kinds of fish are sheephead, porgies, drum,  red, Spanish mackerel, bluefish, speckeled trout, yellow trout, mullets, starfish, butter perch, shad, herring, sunfish, redfins, sea mullets, pinfish, sand perch, hogfish, Welchman, sturgeon, suckers, buzzard shad, robins, chub robin, red horse, black sucker, speckled perch, white perch, catfish, grundles,  gar, rock, moon, black, cod, jack, pickerel, toadfish, stingers, skates, carp, chinquepin perch, croaker, spot, flounder, blue joe robin, green gar, pike, sword, hickory shad, eels, abrocore, flat back, yellow fin shad, oyster-fish, black bass, and two varieties of shark, black drum, pike, white cat, black cat,
blue cat, gray cat, making a total of sixty-six varieties remembered.

To these are added other water products more famous: Turtle--the snapper, slider, sea turtle, chicken turtle, green turtle, and the epicure's delicious "diamond-back" terrapin ; soft, hard-shell and stone crabs; escallops, shrimps, clams, oysters, of which latter both the New River and Nelson Bay are equally as good as the Lynnhaven in size and flavor. Thousands of packages of fish are shipped from here to New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and the interior towns of Virginia and the two Carolinas. They are brought to the  packing-houses generally alive, boxed in ice and sent by express, reaching their destination before the ice melts or they become the least stale. The same system prevails in oysters. They are shipped as soon as opened, and are always fresh from the water. The cost of ice, manufactured here, is nominal, and enough of it is used in packing to keep shipments fresh. Some of the largest and most reliable shippers in the South are located here, and are represented by advertisements in this book.
2
 


[Page 18]


PRODUCTS AND SHIPPING.

Major John Ruok, Chief Engineer of the Norfolk, Wilmington and Charleston Railroad (passing through New Berne when completed.--Ed.), in his report to that company of July 15, 1892, has the following: "New Bern is a flourishing town, situated at the confluence of the Neuse and Trent rivers, * * * and has a population of over 12,000 inhabitants."

"In 1891 there was shipped from New Bern over 100,000,000 feet of lumber, going to various points in the North, in the States of Maryland, Delaware, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and the New England States."

"In 1890 there was shipped from New Bern, by all lines, 75,349 barrels of potatoes, 10,607 barrels of vegetables, 40,932 half-crates of vegetables, 3,833 crates of eggs, 6,709 barrels of oysters, 241 tons of fresh fish, 100,000 cans of oysters, and 18,200 melons." (These figures are nearly doubled, since Major Ruok's report, as to truck. In his estimate of population at that time, now nearly correct, he probably included the suburb of James City.--Ed.) He further says: "There is handled at New Bern from 46,000 to 50,000 bales of cotton. * * * And there is received annually 24,000 tons of merchandise."

This year the A. & N. R. R. carried 98,000 packages truck ; the Old Dominion Steamship Line 50,000; the E. C. D.  86,783; grand total of 234,783 packages and barrels.

COTTON MARKET.

For years New Berne has been one of the best cotton markets in the State. There is a good corps of buyers, belonging to the Exchange, several of whom buy for and ship on through bills lading directly to European markets via Wilmington over the Wilmington, New Berne and Norfolk Railroad, and Norfolk via the Eastern Carolina Dispatch and the Old Dominion Steamship lines. It is generally shipped as fast as brought, but little being kept in storage here. Freight to Europe is seventy cents per hundred and insurance one-eighth of one per cent. Prices range with those paid in Wilmington.


[Page 19]


POPULATION

The United States census in 1890 gave the population of New Berne at 7,843. This was an increase of twenty-three and a fraction per cent. over the 1880 census. The city authorities had a police census taken in September, 1893, which gave the population at 8,526, making an increase of 683, or eight per cent. in two and a half years. Just across the Trent river is James City, containing some 2,500 colored people, who practically do their business in New Berne, though outside the corporate limits, and, therefore, not included in either census.

CEDAR GROVE CEMETERY.
D.H. STALLINGS, SEXTON.

This beautiful resting place of the mortal remains of most of New Berne's honored dead who have "crossed over the river" since 1800, is in a grove of cedar and other evergreen and shade trees in the western part of the city. There are numerous vaults, monuments and tombs in well-kept plots, while the whole is surrounded by a wall of the beautiful native shell rock. Over the arch of the main entrance, engraved in the shell rock, is to be found its history in the words, "CEDAR GROVE CEMETERY, opened A. D. 1800 by Christ Church. Transferred by the Church A. D. 1854 to the authorities of the town, by whom this wall was erected." All in all it is one of the most sightly "grounds of the dead" to be found in the whole country.

NEW BERNE NATIONAL CEMETERY.
THOMAS O'SHEA, SUPERINTENDENT.

The cemetery is about one mile north of the railway station in New Berne and fronts east on the Government road. The lot is a rectangle of 825 feet by 400 feet and contains seven and one-half acres of land, purchased by the United States for $570.17-1/2. It is enclosed by a brick wall, along the inside of which ivy is planted. The lodge, outhouses and rostrum are built of shell rock, a conglomerate of marine shells imbedded in a matrix of natural hydraulic cement.


[Page 20]


The cemetery is divided by grassed driveways into eighteen burial sections, and in these the graves are arranged in parallel rows and all marked by headstones. The ground is everywhere well covered with grass and always kept closely cut.

The trees and shrubbery consist chiefly of oaks, maples, elms, poplars, sycamores, and different varieties of arborvitae. The number of graves is three thousand two hundred and ninety-four, which are classified as follows, viz.:
White Union soldiers and sailors (known)---------- 1,852
White Union soldiers and sailors (unknown) ------- 873
Colored Union soldiers (known) ------------------- 229
Colored Union soldiers (unknown) ---------------- 195
------
Total Union soldiers and sailors ------------ 3,194
Citizens, women and children --------------------- 145
------
Total interments -------------------------- 3,294

The burials are made by States, so far known. About four hundred of the interments were made originally here. The remains of the others were removed from the old cemetery at New Berne, Beaufort, N.C., Morehead, Kingston, Hatteras, Roanoke Island and many other places along the coast of North Carolina.

NOTE.--Amongs the interments of the cemetery appear ther graves of Charles E. Coledge, a private of the 25th Massachusetts Artillery, and Miss Carrie E. Cutter also of that State. They are buried side by side. The records show that they were betrothed and that she was buried by him at her own request and by authority of the Secretary of War. The interments were originally made at Roanoke Island, and the dates of death in the early part of 1862. The story goes that she dropped dead upon his grave, but for this latter fact I cannot vouch. The United States has furnished her with a soldier's headstone--this being the only instance in which it has been given.

THE NEW BERNE WATER COMPANY.
JOHN F. ZEBLEY, President. H.B. ZEBLEY, Treasurer.

The system consists of ten deep artesian wells connected with two first-class compound steam-pumps capable of pumping


[Page 21]


two million gallons of water per diem, with a boiler capacity of double the real requirements, and placed in an absolutely fireproof pump-house. These pumps are arranged to pump either directly into the standpipe or by a cut-off valve into a pipe system alone.

The standpipe is one hundred and twenty feet high, by sixteen feet in diameter, furnishing ample fire pressure and quantity.

There are seventy-five double nozzle hydrants, giving fire protection to the entire city through seven and one-half miles of heavy cast iron pipe, none less than six inches diameter and as large in main lines as twelve inches diameter.

THE NEW BERNE SEWERAGE COMPANY.
JOHN F. ZEBLEY, President. B.W. HOMANS, Treasurer.

The system consists of six miles of the "separate system," conveying house sewerage alone, and drains the entire portion of the city occupied by residences and stores. It awaits the completion of the water-works to permit flushing by means of the automatic flush-tank, and will then be equal to the best system now in use anywhere.

EAST CAROLINA FISH, OYSTER, GAME AND
INDUSTRIAL ASSOCIATION.

The first Fair held by this Association was November 13, 1887. It was permanently organized in April, 1888. The annual premiums aggregate between %5,000 and $6,000, Present officers: President, William Dunn; Vice-Presidents, E.H. Meadows, Joel Kinsey, W.G. Brinson, T.A.
McIntyre. Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Reizenstein; Directors, J.A. Meadows, C.E. Foy, T.A. Green, George H. Roberts, Ralph Gray, George Henderson, W.P. Burrus, O.H. Guion, P.H. Pelletier, J.A. Bryan, W.H. Bray, W.F. Crockett, George N. Ives, J.W. Stewart.

These fairs are usually held in February, and are generally considered the best held in the State, while it is universally conceded that, so far as the fish, oyster and game exhibits are concerned, they far excel any other Fair in the United States.
 


[Page 22]


ST. JOHN'S COMMANDERY, No. 10, K. T.
MEETS FIRST AND THIRD FRIDAYS.
Joseph H. Hackburn.............................E. C.
Ferdinand Ulrich..................................G.
Hugh J. Lovick.................................C. G.
Thomas Daniels................................Ex. P.
S. R. Street...................................S. W.
James Redmond..................................J. W.
Thomas A. Green...........................Treasurer.
Thomas F. McCarthy.........................Recorder.
L. J. Taylor........................Standard Bearer.
E. F. Rowe.............................Sword Bearer.
John C. Green................................Warden.
W.R. Warters...............................Sentinel.
Membership, 17.

NEW BERNE CHAPTER, No. 46, R. A. M.
Thomas A. Green................................H. P.
Joseph H. Hackburn................................K.
Ferdinand Ulrich..................................S.
Needham Case................................C. of H.
John C. Green..................................P. S.
O. Marks....................................R. A. C.
S. R. Street............................M. of 3rd V.
Benjamin Hahn............................M. of 2d V.
J. S. Mann..............................M. of 1st V.
R. S. Primrose............................Treasurer.
Hugh J. Lovick............................Secretary.
W. R. Warters.................................Guard.
Membership, 27.

ST. JOHN'S LODGE, No. 3, A., F. & A. M.
MEETS SECOND WEDNESDAY.
Thomas Daniels.................................W. M.
Hugh J. Lovick.................................S. W.
O. H. Guion....................................J. W.
John C. Green..................................S. D.
Robert S. Primrose.............................J. D.
Thomas A. Green...........................Treasurer.
J.S. Basnight.............................Secretary.
W. R. Warters.................................Tiler.
 


[Page 23]


ATHENIA LODGE, No. 8, K. of P.
MEETS EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT AT HOWARD'S HALL.

J.W. Waters....................................C. C.
J. C. Scales...................................V. C.
J. H. Benton................................Prelate.
T. W. Dewey.................................M. of W.
W. B. Boyd...........................K. of R. and S.
T. A. Green.................................M. of E.
R. D. Hancock...............................M. of F.
W. R. Warters...............................M. at A.
J. E. Gaskill..................................I. G.
Eli Elliott....................................O. G.

SUPREME LODGE, KNIGHTS OF HARMONY.

John S. Manix.....................Supreme President.
J. K. Willis.................Supreme Vice-President.
W. B. Boyd........................Supreme Secretary.
T. H. Davis.......................Supreme Treasurer.
S. R. Ball.........................Supreme Chaplain.
H. C. Whitehurst...........................Attorney.
H. H. Tooker................................Marshal.
J. T. Lincoln........................Deputy Marshal.
J. L. Quidby..................................Guard.
Membership September 30, 1893, 215.

CRAVEN LODGE, No. 1, KNIGHTS OF HARMONY.
MEETS IN HOWARD'S HALL SECOND AND FOURTH WEDNES-
DAY NIGHTS.

S. R. Ball................................President.
J. T. Lewis..........................Vice-President.
J. H. Smith...............................Secretary.
W. B. Boyd......................Financial Secretary.
John P. Hall..............................Treasurer.
A. T. Stotesbury...........................Chaplain.
H. H. Hooker................................Marshal.
J. C. Scales............................Inner Guard.
J. R. Medford...........................Outer Guard.
 


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ORDER OF CHOSEN FRIENDS.
MEETS FIRST AND THIRD WEDNESDAY NIGHTS.

G. L. Wadsworth..........................Councillor.
T. J. Crowder.......................Vice-Councillor.
W. F. Rountree............................Secretary.
K. R. Jones...............................Treasurer.
W. B. Boyd..................................Prelate.
C. F. Hargett...............................Marshal.
D. L. Roberts................................Warden.
F. Boesser.................................Guardian.
E. Tucker..................................Sentinel.

EUREKA LODGE, No. 7, I. O. O. F.

J. B. Clark....................................N. G.
B. B. Neal.....................................V. G.
H. M. Groves..............................Secretary.
H. L. Hall......................Financial Secretary.
Joseph Cohen..............................Treasurer.
J. H. Benton.............................Past Grand.
John H. Ellis................................Warden.
T. W. Dewey...............................Conductor.
T. H. Davis.............................Outer Guard.
A. S. Dixon.............................Inner Guard.

CALUMET ENCAMPMENT, No. 4, I. O. O. F.

Joseph Cohen........................Chief Patriarch.
J. E. Warren..........................Senior Warden.
J. H. Benton............................High Priest.
B. B. Neal............................Junior Warden.
W. B. Boyd...................................Scribe.

CRAVEN LODGE, No. 37, R. S. G. F.

N. Tisdale....................................Ruler.
S. B. Waters.............................Instructor.
S. R. Ball...............................Councillor.
W. G. Brinson.............................Secretary.
W. F. Rountree..................Financial Secretary.
W. B. Boyd................................Treasurer.
H. Taylor..................................Director.
S. W. Willis................................Prelate.
J. K. Willis.................................Warden.
B. F. Stilly...............................Sentinel.
 


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TRENT LODGE, No. 411, R. A.
MEETS IN HOWARD'S HALL FIRST FRIDAY NIGHTS.

C. L. Ives...................................Regent.
S. K. Eaton.............................Vice Regent.
J. R. Parker.................................Orator.
S. M. Brinson.............................Secretary.
W. B. Boyd................................Collector.
W. F. Rountree............................Treasurer.
R. A. Richardson...........................Chaplain.
A. E. Hibbard.................................Guide.
F. Boesser...................................Warden.
E. Tucker....................................Sentry.
Members, 122.

KNIGHTS OF HONOR.
MEETS SECOND AND FOURTH FRIDAY NIGHTS IN HOWARD'S
HALL.

G. K. Bagby................................Dictator.
Joseph Cohen............................V. Dictator.
S. D. Pope..............................A. Dictator.
W. B. Boyd.................................Reporter.
W. F. Rountree...................Financial Reporter.
K. R. Jones...............................Treasurer.
H. L. Hall.................................Chaplain.
J. S. Basnight................................Guide.
F. Boesser.................................Guardian.
E. Tucker..................................Sentinel.

AMERICAN LEGION OF HONOR.

John S. Long..............................Commander.
Hill Humphrey........................Vice-Commander.
W. B. Boyd................................Secretary.
T. G. Dixon...............................Collector.
John C. Green................................Orator.
W. F. Rountree............................Treasurer.
C. E. Foy..................................Chaplain.
M. Hahn.......................................Guide.
D. L. Roberts................................Warden.
J. A. Patterson..............................Sentry.
 


[Page 26]


ORDER OF TONTI.

A. R. Dennison............................President.
H. B. Lane...........................Vice-President.
W. B. Boyd................................Secretary.
R. A. Willis..............................Treasurer.
G. A. Atkinson...............................Warden.
T. J. Turner...............................Sentinel.

ORDER OF PENTI.

H. J. Lovick..............................President.
H. E. Baxter.........................Vice-President.
W. B. Boyd................................Secretary.
C. L. Ives................................Treasurer.
J. H. Ellis................................Chaplain.

ORDER OF FRATERNAL LEGION.

J. K. Willis..............................Commander.
W. B. Boyd.................................Adjutant.
George D. Bowen...................Enrolling Officer.
S. H. Scott...............................Treasurer.
John Suter.................................Guardian.
Thomas Bowden..............................Sentinel.

FIRE DEPARTMENT.
The city has two volunteer steam companies. The Atlantic, organized in 1845. This company uses a Silsby engine, and has a membership of thirty-three. The New Bern No. 1 was organized in 1865, uses a Button engine, and has a membership of thirty. In connection are two horse hose carriages, carrying a total of some 2,500 feet of hose. The officers of the department are:

CHIEF ENGINEER.....................E. W. Smallwood.
SECRETARY AND TREASURER...........W. D. Barrington.
FOREMAN ATLANTIC..................W. D. Barrington.
FOREMAN NEW BERNE.......................J.W. Moore.

The general alarm system is used, and bell repeats taps as sent from box. There are ten alarm stations. This was the first fire department in the State to have trained horses and hanging harness, and it has been victorious in every fire tournament in which it took part.
 


[Page 27]


COTTON AND GRAIN EXCHANGE.
CRAVEN STREET.
OFFICERS ELECTED OCTOBER 4, 1893.

PRESIDENT...........................S. W. Smallwood.
VICE-PRESIDENT....................Dr. Charles Duffy.
TREASURER...............................T. A. Green.
SECRETARY..............................James Redman.
SUPERINTENDENT........................D. T. Caraway.
DIRECTORS: R. R. Jones, J. A. Latham, Matt. Manly, G.
A. Oliver and C. E. Foy.

CHURCHES.

CHRIST, EPISCOPAL.--Corner Middle and Pollock streets.
Rev. T. N. M. George, Rector. Residence, 82 Craven street.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN.--New street. Rev. C. G. Vardell,
Pastor. Residence, Johnson street.
BAPTIST.--Middle street. Rev. Rufus Ford, Pastor. Resi-
dence, corner of Johnson and Graves streets.
CENTENARY METHODIST EPISCOPAL.--New street. Rev.
W. T. Willis, Pastor. Residence, corner Middle and New
streets.
HANCOCK STREET METHODIST EPISCOPAL.--Rev. J. F.
Butt, Pastor. Residence, New street.
DISCIPLES.--Hancock street. Rev. D. J. Petrie, Pastor.
Residence, New street.
HEBREW SYNAGOGUE.--Middle street. Dr. J. Kaiser,
Rabbi. Residence, 40 South Front street.
ROMAN CATHOLIC.--Corner Middle and New sts. Father
P. F. Quinn, Priest. Residence, 167 Middle street.
FREEWILL BAPTIST.--Fleet street. Rev. ---- Lupton,
Pastor. Residence, ----.
EPISCOPAL CHAPEL.-- ------- street. Rev. T. M. N. George.
Residence, -- Craven street.

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.

Brinson, W. G., 65 South Front street.
Hill, E. G., corner South Front and Hancock streets.
Street, S. R., 79 South Front street.
Ulrich, F., 46 Middle street.


[Page 28]


INSURANCE AGENTS.

Brinson, W. G., 65 South Front street.
Henderson, George, 4 Craven street.
Howard, M. R., 55 Pollock street.
Long, John S., 70 Craven street.
Oliver, W. H., 57 South Front street.
Street, S. R., 79 South Front street.
See general directory for residence.

LAWYERS.

Bragaw, S. C., 70 Middle street, up stairs.
Clark & Clark, 79 Pollock st.; residence, 85 Pollock st.
Caho, W. T., 76 South Front st.; residence, Fulford House.
Guion, O. H., 71 Middle street, up stairs; residence, 186
Middle street.
Moore, L. J., 74 South Front st.; residence, 83 Craven st.
McIver, W. D., 114 Middle street, rooms 1 and 3 up stairs;
residence, same.
Mann, J. S., 68 Craven street; residence, same.
Nixon, R. B., 65 Pollock street.
O'Hara, J. E. (col.), 31 Craven st.; residence, George st.
Simmons & Gibbs, 68 South Front Street.
Stevenson, M. D. W., 72 South Front street; residence, 119
Pollock street.
Stevenson, Harry C., 72 South Front street; residence, 106
Craven street.
Tisdale, Frank., 76 South Front street; residence, same.
Thomas, C. R., 72 Craven st.; residence, East Front st.
Waters, J. W., 55 South Front st.; residence, 10 Change st.
Whitehurst, H. C., 60 Craven st.; residence, 19 Queen st.
White, George H. (col.), 64 Broad street; residence on
Johnson and Metcalf streets.
Williamson, R. W. (col.), 62 Craven street; residence, 75
Burn street.

DENTISTS.

Clark, J. D., D. D. S., 86 Craven street; residence, same.
Bagby, G. K., D. D. S., 95 Middle street; residence, same.
Benton, J. H., D. D. S., 99 Middle street; residence, 38
New street.
 


[Page 29]


NEW BERNE'S RAILROAD LINES.

Though not claiming to be the great railroad centre of the South, the two lines running into New Berne afford most excellent and ample passenger and freight facilities. The Atlantic and North Carolina, running from Goldsboro to Morehead City, of which W. S. Chadwick is President,
and S. L. Dill is Superintendent, has its main offices and company shops (and gets the bulk of its patronage) here. The management is conservative, and the increase in freights from the trucking and lumber interests has recently put the road in a better condition than ever before, the stock having more than doubled in market value, and the first dividend declared.

The completion in August of the Wilmington, New Berne and Norfolk road to this place. gives easy and quick transportation South via Wilmington, and North to the truck, fish and oysters of the Jacksonville and New River section, via the New Berne and the Atlantic and North Carolina road. This road runs through the finest timber lands of the State, is under efficient management, and when completed to Norfolk will shorten the time from Wilmington to New York and Philadelphia some five or six hours. Its road-bed from New Berne to Wilmington is one of the best in the State. Their head office is in Wilmington, with H.A. Whiting General Superintendent, and J.W. Martenis, General Freight and Passenger Agent.

Both of these lines connect with steamers to Elizabeth City and Norfolk, and give through bills to Northern, Southern and European points.

-----

W.D. McIver, Lawyer, Law and Commercial Collections

100 and 102 Middle Street, Rooms 1 and 2, second floor.

-----

Owen H. Guion, Attorney at Law, New Berne, N.C.
 


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Images scanned by Dean Knight.
Text prepared by Victor T. Jones, Jr.

This page last edited on 19 Aug 09.

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